BUZZARD ON SHERIFFMUIR WAS ‘INTENTIONALLY’ POSOINED

Tests on a bird of prey found dead on Sheriffmuir, near Stirling, have revealed that the animal was poisoned.

A buzzard
The buzzard was found by a member of the public in September

The buzzard was found by a member of the public in September.

Police said they were treating the incident as an “intentional killing” after tests proved the bird had ingested poison.

They have appealed to visitors to the Ochil Hills and the Sheriffmuir area to contact them if they have any information about the killing.

Police Insp Gerry McMenemy said:

“The buzzard was found by a member of the public and subsequent investigations proved the bird had been killed by ingestion of poison.

“We are treating the incident as an intentional killing of a protected bird and are appealing for anyone who has any information that may be relevant to this crime to contact us.”

CONTACT  HERE

STORY REPORTED BY BBC NEWS HERE

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Sheriffmuir Wildlife Diaries #1 – (Filming tadpoles on the moors)

Sheriffmuir Wildlife Diaries #1 – (Filming tadpoles on the moors)

FWN Test Out New Eco-friendly Electric Bikes.

On Sunday Colin and myself took a trip up to Ashfield near Dunblane to test out our new Cyclamatic E-bikes which we are using to bring you news stories and videos of the local wildlife around Central Scotland.

These bikes are eco friendly and have a range of 20 miles, which gives us a larger area to cover now.

On our travel we checked out the far wood for Red Kites and spotted a few Pink Footed Geese, taking a well earned rest and some food for there long journey home.

Colin then shows us a burn where he hopes to film a wild otter and in a future project film some underwater video of life beneath the surface.

We then ride up to Kinbuck to check out the rabbits on the hillside and we then come across some Canada Geeseon the river bank.

Continue reading “FWN Test Out New Eco-friendly Electric Bikes.”

Swan Diary #11

Yesterday was a fine, sunny, Autumnal day so I took the opportunity to visit the Swan Pond. As I reported last week the swans had migrated and only the Ducks a few moorhens are there just now. Also some seagulls looking for easy meals from the local people bringing bread and corn seeds on there daily walks.

As I approached the pond I always check out the far fields where the Herons usually sit. My binoculars panned to the far off wood and I was rewarded with a magnificent site of a Roe Deer feeding on the grass in front.

As I looked I then realised there were three deer, I quickly got my camera and took a few photos, unfortunately my camera isn’t equipped with a powerful lens but at least I got some images.

I changed to movie mode and I filmed them as they made their way into the Heron field. It was so thrilling to watch them albeit from afar.

Roe Deer

Roe Deer picture 1The roe deer is primarily found in areas of mixed woodland but is capable of adapting to a wide variety of habitats. It is a small deer and is reddish-brown in summer, while greyer in winter months. The roe deer is generally more solitary than its larger red cousin, and is to be found at lower altitudes. They are distinguishable facially by a black ‘moustache’ stripe and white chin, and also by a cream coloured rump patch. Male roe deer are larger than females and have short antlers bearing no more than three points.When to see this species : Spring, Autumn

 

RED SQUIRREL WEEK

A red squirrel finds some nuts Credit: ITV Border

To celebrate the start of Red Squirrel Week, the Scottish Wildlife Trust has launched a campaign which calls on nature lovers to help save the red squirrel from extinction in Scotland.

Following the success of the Trust’s campaign earlier this year, thousands more households across the country will be receiving a copy of a hand-illustrated booklet entitled “The last red squirrel in Scotland?”.

Since 1952, 95% of red squirrels have been lost south of the border and Scotland now contains three quarters of the UK’s remaining population. The biggest threat comes from grey squirrels which, although only introduced from North America in the 1870s, now number in their millions.

Grey squirrels are larger and outcompete red squirrels for food. They also carry squirrelpox, a virus almost always fatal to reds. The disease reached the south of Scotland in 2007.

The Scottish Wildlife Trust is leading the fight to save this much-loved species by containing the spread of the squirrelpox virus and preventing greys from moving further north through targeted control activity. It is also planting thousands of native trees to improve red squirrel habitat, which has become fragmented and diminished.

Simon Milne, Chief Executive, said:

“The red squirrel is so much a part of our landscape that many people don’t realise just how serious the situation has become. The red squirrel could disappear from Scotland within our lifetime.

“No one is doing more to save the red squirrel than the Scottish Wildlife Trust. That’s why we are calling on people who love Scotland and its iconic wildlife to join us. With your help, we can take action before it’s too late.”

A red Squirrel on the look out Photo: ITV Border

SAVING SCOTLANDS RED SQUIRRELS

Scottish Wildcats Found In Cairngorms National Park

 

Conservationists have discovered previously unknown populations of Scottish wildcats living in the Cairngorms National Park.

Scientists have warned the species remains under threat because of cross-breeding with domestic and feral cats.

 

Story reported by BBC.

 

Iconic Brands Join Forces To Save Red Squirrels

The Scottish Wildlife Trust and the House of Bruar have joined forces, raising money to protect Scotlands dwindling red squirrel population.

The House of Bruar, the prestigious department store in Highland Perthshire, yesterday (Thursday) hosted an event for The Scottish Wildlife Trust, lead partner in the Saving Scotlands Red Squirrels project.

The partnership will raise funds and awareness for the project in Perthshire, stronghold of the native red squirrel. The project aims to halt the spread of grey squirrels from the south, through targeted grey squirrel control, protecting the iconic red squirrel. The House of Bruar will be donating a percentage of this weekends art gallery sales to support the Saving Scotlands Red Squirrels project.

The Saving Scotlands Red Squirrels project includes the fight to contain the threat from deadly squirrelpox disease in the Borders and Dumfries and Galloway.

Since 1952, a staggering 95% of red squirrels have been wiped out south of the border. Without urgent action now, they could be gone from Scotland within our lifetime.

Scottish Wildlife Trust Chairman Allan Bantick said:

This is a prestigious partnership for the Scottish Wildlife Trust. The area around the House of Bruar is critical to the Saving Scotlands Red Squirrels project. We hope that the guests at the exclusive event tonight appreciate the seriousness of our fight.

More funding is urgently required to ensure the long term success of the Saving Scotlands Red Squirrels project and the survival of the iconic red squirrel in Scotland. Money raised as part of our partnership with the House of Bruar is vital to continue trapping, monitoring and containing the threat of squirrelpox.

Many thanks to those people whove already contributed to the project, both landowners whose land has been used and those who have contributed money.”

House of Bruar Managing Director Patrick Birkbeck said:

We are very lucky to live in beautiful surroundings of which the wildlife plays such a big part. I am delighted to be in a position to offer support to The Scottish Wildlife Trust and I am glad that The House of Bruar can play a small part in raising awareness for such a worthy project.

Oasis Of Wildlife At Lecropt

Lecropt Is An Oasis of Wildlife,

When Other Places Fail, It Doesn’t !

Colin
at Lecropt

Lecropt is one of my favourite places on my journey when cycling to and from the River, each day I observe various and different Wildlife while having a rest on my returning journeys.

The countryside of Lecropt has an abundance of Wildlife and various species of wild plants and trees.

The photos I have posted have been taken souly on the land of Lecropt over a couple of days, the most popular bird which it’s famous for, is the Lecropt Buzzard’s, which can be seen soaring above the woods on ‘Hangman’s hill’,  (aptly named).

Many years back Lecropt was a vibrant community, having their own laws , school and church, self governed with its very close and tight community.

Fox
(Vulpes vulpes)

A couple of nights ago I spotted the Foxin a field below the church, one minute it was there the next it had vanished into the long grass I managed to get the camera out quickly and got the one shot.

As soon as I got home I couldn’t resist getting out the brushes and canvas , and started painting a Red Fox,while it was still fresh in my mind. What you see in the photo of me next to the painting, is the first layer of paint, and has lots detail still to add but when I finish it, I will post the finished painting on FWN.

The Fox inspired me to paint.

The Red Kite which is my first of this species and the  Common Spotted-orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) I photographed today on my return journey home, so if your ever wanting to see a bit of Wildlife remember the name Lecropt, my little Wildlife oasis, which never fails me, when in other places does fail me for getting that photo.

Enjoy
Colin Statter
FWN

Swan Diary #7 – Coots

Today, I went to the pond early in the morning, after another week of torrential rain in Scotland the weather held off long enough for me to observe the latest ‘news‘ on the Pond.

The Cygnets are looking more like adults than ever and there long slender necks are a site to behold.

The Ducks too are growing at a rapid rate, but its the Coots who stole the show this week. After me thinking there was no chance of any eggs hatching, what did I see on the far side ? Five young babies swimming along with mum and dad.

Take a look at the photos I got below.